From the Blogs: “As I Lay Dying” — Patient Readmission and Noncompliance

August 8, 2017

From the Blogs: “As I Lay Dying” — Patient Readmission and Noncompliance

How do we establish a care partnership with patients who seem hellbent on self-destruction? Blogger Alexandra Godfrey, PA-C, shares her ideas and asks her medical colleagues to weigh in with theirs, in this week's In Practice blog post.

“The patient is stabilized during every admission, but she never appears to retain any of the education or advice given to her. Or if she does, she pays little attention to it. Control of her diabetes worsens. She lives crisis to crisis,” writes Alexandra Godfrey, PA-C, in the In Practice blog. The patient she describes is a young woman with 17 emergency department visits for diabetic ketoacidosis within 2 years. Godfrey discusses the conditions that lead to repeat readmissions and noncompliance and initiates a discussion on prevention.

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Reader Comments (1)

Donald Hoffman, MD, PhD, MBA Physician, Pulmonary Medicine, 1713 NE Federal Highway, Stuart, FL 34994

Deal with this problem daily. Not always successfully. Many causes including the patient but also hospitalist handoffs, misdiagnoses, poor discharge process, unavailable primary appointments among others. In part is a system problem.

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