From the Blogs: Which Feature of Electronic Health Records Is Most Important to Patient Care?

May 17, 2017

From the Blogs: Which Feature of Electronic Health Records Is Most Important to Patient Care?

What function of electronic health records would you miss most if it were unavailable? Take the poll in HIV and ID Observations.

The complexity of electronic health records (EHRs), says Dr. Paul Sax, steals attention away from patients. But EHRs do some things so well that most doctors, he posits, would not go back to the days of paper. What functions would you miss most if EHRs were no longer available? Take the poll in the latest HIV and ID Observations blog post.

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Reader Comments (5)

Bushra Ambreen

Single EMR nationwide ... where all providers can communicate with each other and retrieve information efficiently.

Jerry Ginsburg Physician, Cardiology, SMHI

The EHR is an abomination of the physician-patient relationship. Pounding away on a keyboard, with my back to the patient?? 'bout the only thing I might miss is an uptodate problem list, and immediate access to Uptodate. The rest is pretty much inaccurate bullshiot, copied from the prior note, or a template. ALAS!!

TERRI MCGINNIS Other, Other

I might miss ability to exchange a record quickly with another consulting specialist. However, all the other downsides make me question the real value of EMR. EMR does not make me a better health care provide. It just makes me more tired and less interested in helping others.

NANCY MCELWAIN Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice

Communication details

BERRY TAYLOR JR Physician, Preventive Medicine

As a retired physician manager, and now Medicare patient, I consider the various EHR that I have seen over the past decade to be high comedy.

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