From the Blogs: Poll — Should We Allow 24-Hour Shifts Again for Interns?

March 15, 2017

From the Blogs: Poll — Should We Allow 24-Hour Shifts Again for Interns?

Should interns be allowed to work 24-hour shifts? Take the poll in HIV and ID Observations.

In the latest HIV and ID Observations blog post, Dr. Paul Sax highlights a piece he wrote for WBUR's CommonHealth blog about the new rule that will allow medical interns to work up to 28-hour shifts. Should interns be allowed to work 24-hour shifts? Vote in the poll!

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Reader Comments (1)

Chris Van Hemelrijck Physician, Emergency Medicine

Yes! The pivot point was the Libby Zion "watershed" litigation suite brought by a high profile New York attorney alleging that resident(s) in training were criminally negligent in the care of his daughter. The matter was ultimately filed as a civil suite with additional provisions set forth by the Bell Commission. The unfortunate outcome was the result of a Medicare reimbursement scheme that incentivised the "off-service" assignment of patients that were assigned to a private physicians. If this patient had been appropriately assigned to the "on-service" staff it is unlikely that there would have been a lapse in timely & appropriate management. The private physician who accepted this patient "off-service" should have been held accountable for not responding appropriately.

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