HPV-Associated Cancers Increased in 2008–2012

July 12, 2016

HPV-Associated Cancers Increased in 2008–2012

  1. Amy Orciari Herman, Physician's First Watch

The vast majority of cancers diagnosed were vaccine-preventable.

  1. Amy Orciari Herman, Physician's First Watch

Roughly 39,000 human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers (those at anatomic sites associated with HPV) were diagnosed in the U.S. each year from 2008 through 2012. The age-adjusted incidence rate for this period was 11.7 per 100,000 people, representing an increase over the previous 5-year period, when the rate was 10.8 per 100,000.

CDC researchers analyzed 2008–2012 data from population-based cancer registries. The most common HPV-associated cancers were cervical and oropharyngeal. Cervical cancers were diagnosed more often among blacks and Hispanics than among whites. Oropharyngeal cancers were more common among males than among females, while anal and rectal cancers were more common among females.

Of the HPV-associated cancers diagnosed each year, roughly 80% were actually attributable to HPV; of these, nearly 93% were caused by HPV strains for which vaccines are available.

Comment — Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

  1. Deborah Lehman, MD

HPV vaccine was licensed for use in females in 2007 and in males in 2010. Uptake is modest at best for this cancer-preventing vaccine. This reported increase in HPV-associated cancers for both men and women should be a reminder to strongly advocate for HPV vaccine for all preteens.

Editor Disclosures at Time of Publication

  • Disclosures for Deborah Lehman, MD at time of publication Leadership positions in professional societies AAP PREP The Course (Member, Planning Committee)

Citation(s):

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.