Consensus Sleep Recommendations for Children Endorsed by American Academy of Pediatrics

Summary and Comment |
June 14, 2016

Consensus Sleep Recommendations for Children Endorsed by American Academy of Pediatrics

  1. John D. Cowden, MD, MPH

For children age 4 months to 18 years, specific amounts of sleep are recommended based on health and behavior outcomes.

  1. John D. Cowden, MD, MPH

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine developed a set of consensus recommendations for amounts of sleep for children of different ages based on evidence review and expert discussion. The recommendations state that to promote optimal health, children should regularly sleep the following amounts per 24 hours:

  • Infants aged 4 to 12 months: 12 to 16 hours (including naps)

  • Children aged 1 to 2 years: 11 to 14 hours (including naps)

  • Children aged 3 to 5 years: 10 to 13 hours (including naps)

  • Children aged 6 to 12 years: 9 to 12 hours

  • Teenagers aged 13 to 18 years: 8 to 10 hours

The recommendations have been endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Sleep Research Society, and the American Association of Sleep Technologists.

Comment

Although the recommended amounts of sleep may not differ significantly from what pediatricians already suggest, the consensus statement provides a valuable update on the evidence for the health benefits of adequate sleep and the effects of sleeping too little or too much. The recommendations also serve as a reminder to practitioners and parents to think of sleep when assessing children with problematic behavior. In our primary care clinic, poor sleep hygiene in children is common and often included on our differential diagnosis.

Editor Disclosures at Time of Publication

  • Disclosures for John D. Cowden, MD, MPH at time of publication Leadership positions in professional societies Co-Chair, Culture, Ethnicity, and Health Care Special Interest Group, Academic Pediatric Association

Citation(s):

Reader Comments (1)

Ismail Haffejee Physician, Pediatric Subspecialty, University of KZN Medical School, Durban

I heartily agree. The current obesity epidemic in children can be partly attributed to sleep deprivation.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.