General Medicine Year in Review 2015

Letter to Readers |
December 30, 2015

General Medicine Year in Review 2015

  1. Allan S. Brett, MD, Editor-in-Chief

The most important medical topics of 2015, as chosen by the editors of NEJM Journal Watch General Medicine

  1. Allan S. Brett, MD, Editor-in-Chief

Each year, the editors of NEJM Journal Watch General Medicine choose the year's most important thematic areas in clinical research. We try to strike a balance among relevance to primary care, recognition of landmark studies, and acknowledgment of media publicity and public awareness. Some of our stories emerge from one important study, and others come from several studies on a single topic. The order of these stories is not intended to reflect their relative importance.

Our Year in Review Topics for 2015:

A New Blood Pressure Target for High-Risk Patients?

Spironolactone for Resistant Hypertension

Endovascular Treatment of Stroke — A Dramatic Reversal

Cholesterol Guidelines and Statin Therapy: Debate Continues

Corticosteroids for Hospitalized Community-Acquired Pneumonia — Time to Change Practice?

High-Flow Oxygen for Respiratory Support

Functional or Anatomic Testing for Patients with Chest Pain?

Managing Venous Thromboembolism

Testosterone Supplementation in Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels?

Increasing Calcium Intake Has Minimal Effects on Bone-Mineral Density and Fracture Risk

ART for All

Infant Exposure Might Limit Later Peanut Allergies

Editor Disclosures at Time of Publication

  • Disclosures for Allan S. Brett, MD, Editor-in-Chief at time of publication Nothing to disclose

Reader Comments (1)

RAYMOND SCALETTAR Rheumatology

I want to see what your compendium are like

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