Advertisement

For Promoting Breast-Feeding Success, Consistent Follow-Up Is Key

June 19, 2014

For Promoting Breast-Feeding Success, Consistent Follow-Up Is Key

  1. Anne A. Moore, DNP, APRN, FAANP

Phone calls providing professional support made a difference.

  1. Anne A. Moore, DNP, APRN, FAANP

Although the benefits of breast-feeding are well known, relatively few women continue the practice at 3 months postpartum despite a high incidence of early initiation. Researchers in Hong Kong conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled trial involving 722 primiparous mother–infant pairs at three public hospitals to evaluate the efficacy of standard care versus two interventions to promote ongoing breast-feeding. Standard care included group lactation education, individualized assistance for problems, and follow-up after discharge. In-hospital support consisted of three individualized, 30–45-minute support sessions within the first 48 hours postpartum. Weekly telephone follow-up began at 72 hours postpartum and continued for 4 weeks or until breast-feeding was discontinued. Each call lasted 20–30 minutes and focused on general knowledge, feeding patterns, and problems. All education and guidance was provided by midwives or lactation consultants. Participants were queried at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months about the type and amount of infant feeding during the previous 24 hours.

Breast-feeding rates were higher throughout follow-up in either intervention group than in the standard-care group. In particular, the telephone-support group was significantly more likely to continue any breast-feeding at 1 month (76% vs. 67%; odds ratio, 1.6) or 2 months (59% vs. 49%; OR, 1.5). Women in this intervention group also were more likely to be exclusively breast-feeding at 1 month (OR, 1.9), and were 20% less likely to discontinue breast-feeding at 6 months.

Comment

The authors attribute the success of the telephone-support intervention to continuity and consistency of information, as the same consultant maintained contact with each participant. Such a supportive relationship with a trained professional could well be a vital strategy in traveling the sometimes rocky road of breast-feeding.

  • Disclosures for Anne A. Moore, DNP, APRN, FAANP at time of publication Consultant / Advisory board Noven Equity Actavis plc Speaker’s bureau Merck; Actavis plc Editorial boards Updates in Clinical Medicine; Journal of Obstetic, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing

Citation(s):

Reader Comments (1)

Dr Jude Omoregie Other Healthcare Professional, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Central Hospital Auchi

NEJM is a good source of Continuous medical Education

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement