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Dispatcher-Assisted Bystander CPR in Children Is Associated with Improved Neurological Outcomes

April 30, 2014

Dispatcher-Assisted Bystander CPR in Children Is Associated with Improved Neurological Outcomes

  1. Kristi L. Koenig, MD, FACEP, FIFEM

A nationwide observational study in Japan showed better 1-month neurological outcomes when prehospital dispatchers offered bystanders CPR instructions.

  1. Kristi L. Koenig, MD, FACEP, FIFEM

Dispatcher-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is used for adults with out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest; however data on its effectiveness in children are scarce. Investigators analyzed data from a national Utstein-style Japanese registry for 5009 children (age <18 years) with out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest from 2008 to 2010. Children were divided into three groups: no bystander CPR (2287); bystander CPR with dispatcher assistance (2019); and bystander CPR without dispatcher assistance (703).

Dispatcher CPR instruction (offered in 54% of cases) significantly increased the rate of bystander CPR (adjusted odds ratio, 7.5). Bystander CPR, both with and without dispatcher assistance, was associated with better 1-month neurological outcomes (adjusted ORs, 1.8 and 1.7, respectively). Whereas conventional CPR was associated with better neurological outcomes at 1-month, chest-compression–only CPR was not.

Comment

Dispatcher CPR instruction dramatically increases the likelihood that bystander CPR will be performed. This effect alone justifies universal adoption of this simple practice.

Editor Disclosures at Time of Publication

  • Disclosures for Kristi L. Koenig, MD, FACEP, FIFEM at time of publication Editorial boards Koenig & Schultz's Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices

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