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Discussion on CardioExchange: Doc, Do I Really Need a New Battery?

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December 20, 2013

Discussion on CardioExchange: Doc, Do I Really Need a New Battery?

  1. The Editors

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  1. The Editors

Tariq Ahmad presents our latest case: A 45-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy who exhibits great improvement and has barely any signs of heart failure. He's due for a new ICD battery, but wonders if he should bother replacing it or even continue his HF medications. What do you recommend?

CardioExchange is an online community hosted by the New England Journal of Medicine and NEJM Journal Watch and dedicated to improving cardiac patient care. Membership is free for medical professionals.

Reader Comments (4)

Hussien Hado, MBBS, MRCP (UK) Fellow-In-Training, Cardiology, Toronto General

Few points need to be clarified here:
Firstly what was the indication was it primary or secondary prevention.
secondly How optimal his anti-failure medications prior to implant
thirdly does the improvement in symptoms associated with meaningful improvement in LVEF ie 40% or more.
If it is primary prevention and he was not optimally medicated prior to implant with improvement of LVEF 40% or more I would not recommend changing the battery.
If it is secondary prevention regardless of the answers to the other questions one will not feel comfortable not to change the battery.

PETER JOHNSON Medical Student, Canberra, ACT Australia

I'm a medical student & I accidentally strayed here, but I like it :-)

Eduardo Mota Physician, Cardiology, Private practice

He should have the batery replaced.

REGULO GARCIA Physician, Internal Medicine, caracas venezuela

I see no reason to deny him the quality of support he has already been on.

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