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Simeprevir and (Especially) Sofosbuvir are Great Leaps Forward — and They Will Cost Plenty

December 9, 2013

Simeprevir and (Especially) Sofosbuvir are Great Leaps Forward — and They Will Cost Plenty

HCV cure just got a whole lot easier with the approval of sofosbuvir. What is the best way to treat HCV genotype 1 today? Take the poll in HIV and ID Observations.

The approval of two new drugs — simeprevir in November and sofosbuvir this past Friday — show great promise for treating hepatitis C virus infection. Both are one pill a day and have fewer side effects than any existing HCV drug, and sofosbuvir adds the benefit of having almost zero important drug-drug interactions. The main problem with these new treatments, says Dr. Paul Sax, is, frankly, their cost. What is the best treatment regimen for HCV genotype 1 today? Take the poll in the HIV and ID Observations blog.

Reader Comments (2)

JEFFREY COHEN Physician, Hospital Medicine

The cost proposed by pharma is outrageous and further illustrates how out of control the industry is. It will force an appraisal of who really needs immediate treatment for chronic Hep C, which runs a slow indolent course in the majority of those infected. Perhaps we'll have to wait a decade for generic formulations!

Merceditas Villanueva Physician, Infectious Disease

For naives: RBV/IFN/SOF or IFN/R/Simeprevir.
For treatment experienced: IFN/R/Simeprevir

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