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Iron Deficiency Anemia: When Do We Stop Scoping?

Feature |
November 6, 2013

Iron Deficiency Anemia: When Do We Stop Scoping?

Why are requests for scoping procedures increasing in patients without bleeding or symptoms? Dr. M. Brian Fennerty questions this escalation of test requests in the latest Gut Check.

Colonoscopy and upper endoscopy are not controversial practices for iron deficiency anemia when bleeding or symptoms of GI disease are present. So why are gastroenterologists being asked to perform these procedures in patients who are younger than 50 and show no evidence of bleeding or symptoms? Dr. M. Brian Fennerty notes an escalation of test requests in this setting and queries approaches to evaluating IDA in Gut Check.

Reader Comments (4)

Fernando Monteiro Correia Pin Physician, Hematology, Rio de Janeiro - Public and private hospitals

As hematologist, my practice is to request such exams as part of investigation of iron deficiency anemia, in adult patients, defined by the usual criteria (microcytic anemia, low ferritin, etc).
To my knowledge there´s increasing request of upper endoscopy and colonoscopy as part of screening test in healthy individuals for preventive reasons, which is quite a questionable procedure.

Stevany Peters

good topic

Guillermo Ramírez Physician, Internal Medicine

...

ROBERT PELLEGRINE

interested in Dr. Fennerty's opinion

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