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Follow-Up After Barrett Esophagus: How Do You Do It, and When Do You Stop (If Ever)?

Feature |
July 17, 2013

Follow-Up After Barrett Esophagus: How Do You Do It, and When Do You Stop (If Ever)?

A lack of post-ablation surveillance data, in addition to recent experiences in the clinic, are raising doubt for Dr. M. Brian Fennerty as to the best surveillance intervals after endoscopic ablation for Barrett esophagus. Read more in the most recent Gut Check.

With the new treatment paradigm of endoscopic ablation for Barrett esophagus comes uncertainty as to the best surveillance intervals to recommend for patients. With a lack of available data on post-ablation surveillance findings, in addition to recent experiences of seeing patients return with neoplasia who were cleared after many years of surveillance, Dr. M. Brian Fennerty calls for input on current practices in this area. Read Gut Check and contribute to the discussion.

Reader Comments (2)

SURESH KHANDEKAR Physician, Gastroenterology, Wilkes Barre PA

BD without dysplasia (on PPI) -EGD at 1,then at 3 and every5 years, stop at age 80 yr unless healthy, active, few comorbidities.

RICHARD LINK Physician, Gastroenterology, Bridgeport Hospital

4 to 6 month flow up initially then annually , depending on age and overall medical condition. Double dose PPI

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