Physician's First Watch

Physician's First Watch

Medical news from NEJM Journal Watch

March 23, 2017

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD

Moderate alcohol consumption seems associated with lower cardiovascular risks, but the relationship is highly nuanced, a study in The BMJ finds.

Researchers linked U.K. primary care, hospital, and mortality records to examine associations between...

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By Joe Elia

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD

A study of the Affordable Care Act's effects in California, New York, Florida, and Texas seems to show that Medicaid expansion was associated with better coverage and...

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By Kristin J. Kelley

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD

The FDA has approved safinamide (marketed as Xadago) for treating increased symptoms of Parkinson disease. The drug is indicated as add-on therapy for patients in whom...

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By the Editors

Pregabalin (Lyrica) doesn't seem to improve sciatica pain, according to a study in the New England Journal of...

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March 22, 2017

By Kelly Young

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Two new cohort studies in JAMA shed light on the adverse events associated with various treatments for localized prostate cancer.

In the first study, researchers compared patient-reported outcomes at 3...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Increases in televised direct-to-consumer testosterone ads were associated with increases in serum testosterone testing and treatment initiation over a 4-year period, a JAMA...

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By Joe Elia

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphomas — a rare condition — occur more...

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By the Editors

Prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation does not lead to improved IQ in school-aged children, according to findings reported...

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March 21, 2017

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

A single glucocorticoid injection offers short-term relief of chronic back pain associated with discopathy, according to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. But the benefits are...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Some 24% of U.S. middle and high school students report recent exposure to the vapors from someone else's electronic cigarettes, according to a research letter...

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By Kelly Young

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

The FDA-approved interferon-free regimens for treating hepatitis C appear to be safe and effective, suggests an Annals of Internal Medicine review.

Researchers examined 42 randomized trials of oral hepatitis C...

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By the Editors

Here's today's offering from NEJM Group:

NEJM Clinical Practice Center: Image in Clinical Medicine: A woman presented to an ophthalmologist with allergic...

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March 20, 2017

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

The Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold is associated with an increased rate of major adverse...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

The American Society of Clinical Oncology has issued guidelines on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination according to the resources available in a patient's community.

Among the recommendations for females,...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

Researchers have identified a population with the lowest recorded prevalence of coronary artery disease — the Tsimane, an indigenous group living a pre-industrial lifestyle in the Bolivian Amazon. The findings were reported in the Lancet...

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By the Editors

The American College of Cardiology's annual meeting brought forth a flood of heart-related medical news this weekend. Here's a quick look at the studies we thought you'd be most interested in:

Rivaroxaban vs. Aspirin for Recurrent VTE: Nearly 3400 adults with venous thromboembolism who'd completed 6–12 months of anticoagulation were randomized to daily rivaroxaban (20 or 10 mg) or aspirin (100 mg). At 1 year, rates of symptomatic recurrent VTE were significantly lower with rivaroxaban (1.5% and 1.2%) than with aspirin (4.4%), with no differences in major bleeding across the groups. Dr. Allan Brett of NEJM Journal Watch General Medicine tells us what the...

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