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Physician's First Watch

Physician's First Watch

Medical news from NEJM Journal Watch

May 27, 2015

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

A new study in BMJ adds to the evidence showing increased venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk with newer versus older combination oral contraceptives.

Using two U.K....

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Delayed umbilical cord clamping is associated with better fine motor and social skills at preschool age, at least among boys, a JAMA Pediatrics study finds.

Researchers studied some 250 children...

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By Kelly Young

Edited by Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

A person traveling to the U.S. from Liberia has died from Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic disease, the CDC reports.

On May 17, the man arrived...

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By Larry Husten

Edited by Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

With no established differences in health outcomes, the relative success of two highly anticipated cholesterol drugs will likely depend on convenience, dosing, and price, Reuters reports....

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By Jenni Whalen

Edited by Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

People with subclinical hyperthyroidism may be at elevated risk for bone fractures, according to a JAMA meta-analysis.

Researchers analyzed data from more...

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May 26, 2015

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Findings from a network meta-analysis in the Lancet may help guide decisions regarding blood pressure-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Researchers examined nearly 160...

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By Paul E. Sax, MD

The following is an excerpt from NEJM Journal Watch's HIV and ID Observations blog:

My friend (and HIV/ID colleague) Mauro Schechter sent me a funny email the other day — from Brazil, where he lives and works:

I just read...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Males who are obese during late adolescence might face increased risk for colorectal cancer later in life, a study in Gut suggests.

Nearly 240,000...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Infants living at very high altitudes appear to be at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, according to a Pediatrics study.

Researchers retrospectively studied nearly 400,000 infants born...

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