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Physician's First Watch

Physician's First Watch

Medical news from NEJM Journal Watch

July 29, 2014

By Larry Husten

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Menopausal hormone therapy may have favorable effects on some cardiovascular risk factors, but it doesn't reduce the progression of atherosclerosis, according to an Annals of Internal Medicine study.

Over...

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By Larry Husten

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Running just 5 minutes a day can extend one's life span. For endurance runners, heat stroke may be a bigger danger than cardiac disorders. These are the lessons learned from two new studies in the Journal of the American College of...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

A screening tool based on a single question can accurately identify substance use disorders among teens, according to a study in JAMA Pediatrics.

Some 200 adolescents aged 12 to 17 at two outpatient primary care centers and one outpatient substance abuse treatment center...

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By Kelly Young

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Given the rapid spread of the Ebola virus in West Africa, the CDC is reminding clinicians to...

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By Kelly Young

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Fist bumps spread far less bacteria that handshakes do, according to research being published in...

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July 28, 2014

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is more prevalent in England than previously believed, a Lancet study finds.

Some 225,000 blood donations collected in southeastern England in 2012-2013 were screened retrospectively for HEV...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD

The percentage of U.S. teens who reported ever using synthetic human growth hormone without a prescription more than doubled from 2012 to 2013 — from 5% to 11% — according...

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By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD

Two new, all-oral drug regimens are largely effective and well tolerated in patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection, according to two industry-funded studies in the Lancet. A Lancet commentator, while enthusiastic about the drugs' efficacy, says their high cost will keep them out of the hands...

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