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High-Trauma Fractures Associated with Low BMD, Future Fracture Risk — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
November 28, 2007

High-Trauma Fractures Associated with Low BMD, Future Fracture Risk

High-trauma fractures are associated with low bone density and increased risk for subsequent fracture in older adults, researchers report in JAMA.

Some 14,000 community-dwelling, primarily white, older women and men were followed for 5 to 9 years. Overall, 264 women and 94 men experienced first high-trauma, nonspine fractures (e.g., those associated with car accidents or falls from greater than standing height).

After multivariable adjustment, a 1-SD decrease in BMD among women was associated with a 45% increase in risk for high-trauma fracture at the hip, a 23% increase at the femoral neck, and a 30% increase at the lumbar spine. Among men, risk increases were 54%, 41%, and 47%, respectively. High-trauma fracture increased subsequent fracture risk by 34% among women; data among men were limited but showed a similar trend.

The authors conclude: "High-trauma nonspine fractures should be considered potentially osteoporotic ... and should receive similar clinical management as low-trauma nonspine fractures."

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