Insulin Pumps Tied to Fewer Type 1 Diabetes Complications in Young Patients — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
October 11, 2017

Insulin Pumps Tied to Fewer Type 1 Diabetes Complications in Young Patients

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Young patients with type 1 diabetes may experience fewer disease complications with insulin pump therapy than with multiple daily injections, according to an observational study in JAMA.

Using a European diabetes database, researchers matched some 9800 pediatric patients (aged 6 months to 19 years) with type 1 diabetes who were receiving intensive insulin therapy via pump with 9800 patients who were receiving intensive therapy via injection. During the most recent treatment year, the rate of severe hypoglycemia was significantly lower with pump versus injection therapy (9.55 vs. 13.97 per 100 patient-years). The rate of diabetic ketoacidosis was also lower with pump therapy (3.64 vs 4.26 per 100 patient-years).

Hypoglycemia benefits were most notable among children aged 6–15 years, and ketoacidosis benefits were most apparent in those aged 16–19 years.

The researchers conclude: "These findings provide evidence for improved clinical outcomes associated with insulin pump therapy compared with injection therapy in children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes."

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