Benefits of Immunotherapy-Probiotic Combo for Peanut Allergy Sustained at 4 Years — Physician’s First Watch

August 17, 2017

Benefits of Immunotherapy-Probiotic Combo for Peanut Allergy Sustained at 4 Years

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM

Use of peanut immunotherapy combined with a probiotic is associated with long-lasting peanut tolerance in allergic children, according to a follow-up study in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

Of 56 children with peanut allergy who were randomized to receive either combined probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus) and peanut oral immunotherapy or placebo daily for 18 months, 90% and 7% were desensitized to peanuts following treatment, respectively. Forty-eight children were available for follow-up 4 years after treatment ended.

At follow-up, children who had been randomized to combination therapy were significantly more likely than placebo recipients to continue eating peanuts (67% vs. 4%). In particular, over half the combination therapy group was regularly consuming moderate-to-large amounts of peanuts.

Allergic reactions to peanuts occurred in 17% of the combo therapy group and 25% of the placebo group; none were anaphylaxis.

Reader Comments (1)

Baudouin F. Petit Physician, Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, Belgium

Lactobacillus rhamnosus is an interesting bug. I recently saw a bottle fed baby with blood in the stools for several weeks, but no other symptoms, happy and growing well. My first impression was mild cow's milk protein allergy. I decided not to change the diet but to try lactobacillus rhamnosus first. After 5 days the bleeding stopped. I advised the parents to continue Lactobacillus rhamnosus and so far there has been no recurrence of symptoms.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.