Gaining Too Much, Too Little Weight in Pregnancy Tied to Adverse Outcomes for Mother, Baby — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 7, 2017

Gaining Too Much, Too Little Weight in Pregnancy Tied to Adverse Outcomes for Mother, Baby

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Women who gain more or less weight than what's recommended during pregnancy face increased risk for adverse outcomes, a JAMA meta-analysis finds.

The Institute of Medicine recommends that underweight women gain 28–40 pounds during a singleton pregnancy; normal-weight women, 25–35 pounds; overweight women, 15–25 pounds; and obese women, 11–20 pounds.

For the meta-analysis, researchers examined data from 23 cohort studies comprising 1.3 million women with singleton pregnancies in the U.S., Asia, and Europe. Overall, 47% of women gained more weight than recommended; 23% gained less than recommended.

Compared with recommended weight gain, excess weight gain was associated with higher risks for having a large-for-gestational-age infant, macrosomia, or cesarean delivery (but somewhat lower risks for preterm birth or having a small-for-gestational-age infant). Lower-than-recommended weight gain, meanwhile, was tied to higher risks for preterm birth or having a small-for-gestational-age infant (but lower risks for having a large-for-gestational-age infant or macrosomia).

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.