Oral Fluid Sobriety Test Could Detect Marijuana Impairment — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 5, 2017

Oral Fluid Sobriety Test Could Detect Marijuana Impairment

By Kelly Young

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

Oral fluid testing for marijuana impairment may be an effective tool for roadside sobriety tests, authors suggest in the journal Injury Prevention.

They cite a study from Belgium that found that on-site oral fluid screening testing for suspected marijuana-related driving under the influence (DUI) had a true-positive rate of 91% and a false-positive rate of 9%. Belgium has required oral fluid tests in cases of suspected marijuana-related DUI since 2009.

The authors conclude: "State DUI statutes that identify marijuana-related DUI by establishing probable cause using field sobriety tests and requiring a blood sample as evidence of intoxication could potentially benefit from the use of [oral fluid] testing. Policy-makers should consider lessons from Belgium and enhance objectivity in marijuana-related DUI procedure."

Reader Comments (2)

Michael Schatman, Ph.D. Other Healthcare Professional, Other, Tufts University School of Medicine

More bad science. Saliva testing may identify the amount of THC in one's system, but not the amount of CBD - which modulates the high. Any halfway decent attorney should be able to get this type of DUI case thrown out of court quickly. Functional impairment testing is the only answer when it comes to this complex drug.

Tpakolie@gmail.com

Good article

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