Swimming Pool-Associated Cryptosporidiosis Outbreaks Being Reported More Often — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 19, 2017

Swimming Pool-Associated Cryptosporidiosis Outbreaks Being Reported More Often

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS

Reported outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis linked to aquatic facilities doubled between 2014 and 2016, according to an MMWR article.

Of 24 states with cryptosporidiosis data for 2016, roughly half reported outbreaks linked to recreational water facilities (e.g., pools, water playgrounds), with a total of 32 outbreaks that year. In 2014, just 16 outbreaks were reported.

MMWR focuses on outbreaks in Alabama, Arizona, and Ohio, where molecular analysis revealed Cryptosporidium hominis as the infecting organism. In Ohio, the increase in reported cases was particularly striking, from roughly 400 cases per year between 2012 and 2015, to 1940 cases in 2016.

The authors say it's unclear whether the increase in outbreaks reflects an actual increase in cases or rather better surveillance methods. They remind clinicians, "Not swimming when ill with diarrhea is key to preventing and controlling aquatic facility-associated cryptosporidiosis outbreaks." Infected patients should be advised to stay out of the water until they have been diarrhea-free for 2 weeks.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.