Fecal Transplantation a Potential New Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 16, 2017

Fecal Transplantation a Potential New Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM

Intensive-dosing fecal microbiota transplantation — roughly 40 infusions over 8 weeks — helps patients with ulcerative colitis achieve clinical remission, according to a Lancet study.

Eighty-five adults with active ulcerative colitis for more than 3 months were randomized to undergo fecal microbiota transplantation or placebo colonic infusion, followed by self-administered fecal transplant or placebo enemas 5 days each week for 8 weeks. Each active-treatment recipient received all of his or her transplants from the same donor batch, which consisted of samples from three to seven donors.

The primary outcome — steroid-free clinical remission plus endoscopic remission or response at 8 weeks — occurred in 27% of the active-treatment group versus 8% of the placebo group. Adverse events, most often self-limited gastrointestinal symptoms, occurred in roughly 80% of participants in each group.

The authors conclude that fecal microbiota transplantation "is a promising new therapeutic option for ulcerative colitis."

Reader Comments (2)

IVAN VUCINA Physician, Internal Medicine, University of Chile-CLC-Santiago de Chile

Dears Drs= I have two questions( I am totally aware about importance of GUT Flora in many and different problems=
1)It was possible to obtain Stool Study before and after treatment?
2)There are Scientific Study about the Bacterial population in UC an Chron´s Disease?(Inflammatory Bowel Disease)

JOHN LEMMO Nurse/NP/PA, Unspecified, retired

Dr. Rupert Turnball of the Cleveland Clinic was doing this limitedly back in the early 70's

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