Insulin Degludec/Liraglutide Appears to Outperform Glargine in Type 2 Diabetes — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
March 2, 2016

Insulin Degludec/Liraglutide Appears to Outperform Glargine in Type 2 Diabetes

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

In adults with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, insulin degludec/liraglutide is noninferior to insulin glargine and may in fact be superior, according to findings from an industry-supported, phase III, noninferiority trial in JAMA. The drug combination has not been approved by the FDA.

Nearly 560 adults with hemoglobin A1c levels of 7–10% while taking glargine and metformin were randomized to either continue glargine or switch to once-daily injections of degludec/liraglutide. In both groups, dosages were titrated twice weekly, with the goal of keeping blood glucose levels between 72 and 90 mg/dL.

By 26 weeks, mean HbA1c levels had decreased by 1.81% with degludec/liraglutide and 1.13% with glargine — demonstrating not only noninferiority of degludec/liraglutide but also statistical superiority. In addition, degludec/liraglutide recipients lost an average of 1.4 kg, while glargine recipients gained 1.8 kg. Degludec/liraglutide recipients also had fewer hypoglycemic episodes. They did, however, experience more nausea.

The researchers call for longer-term data on the safety and effectiveness of the drug combination.

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