Risk Behaviors Do Not Explain Higher HIV Incidence in Young Black MSM — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 12, 2016

Risk Behaviors Do Not Explain Higher HIV Incidence in Young Black MSM

By Cara Adler

Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS

Differences in self-reported HIV-related risk behaviors alone do not account for the disproportionately higher incidence of HIV infection among black compared to white and Hispanic adolescent males who have sex with males (MSM), according to an MMWR study.

Researchers analyzed 2009-2013 survey data for roughly 1700 high-school MSM in 17 large urban public school districts.

Compared with whites and Hispanics, blacks had lower prevalence of some risk factors, including binge drinking and use of ecstasy and inhalants. Blacks had higher prevalence of condom use than whites and higher prevalence of ever having reported sexual intercourse than Hispanics.

Dr. Deborah Lehman of NEJM Journal Watch Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine comments, "Self-report of high-risk behaviors such as substance abuse did not account for the increased risk of HIV infection in black high school students. Increased rates seen in this population may be due to limited access to health information, screening, and care, highlighting the importance of screening all adolescents for HIV infection and improving access to care."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
Last load event
Format: 2016-07-28 18:17:54
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.