Asthma Diagnosis Tied to Higher Risk for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
February 12, 2016

Asthma Diagnosis Tied to Higher Risk for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture

By Kelly Young

Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS

A recent diagnosis of asthma is associated with higher risk for rupture in older patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), according to an observational study in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Using Danish national registries, 4500 patients aged 50 and older with ruptured AAA were compared with 11,000 patients with unruptured AAA.

After multivariable adjustment, patients who had asthma diagnosed in the hospital within the past 180 days were at increased risk for AAA rupture, compared with patients without asthma (odds ratio, 2.06). Diagnosis of asthma beyond that period was not associated with rupture risk. Recent use of bronchodilators and other anti-asthma drugs were also associated with increased risk.

The authors note that elevated levels of mast cells and IgE are present in the bronchi and alveoli of patients with asthma and in AAA lesions. They conclude: "Because allergic inflammation with elevated plasma IgE may promote AAA pathogenesis, other allergic inflammatory diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and several ocular allergic diseases, may carry similar risks as asthma for AAA formation and rupture."

Reader Comments (1)

Kevin Morgan, BVSc, PhD, DipACVP, ExFRCPath Other Healthcare Professional, Pathology, Old Dogs in Training, LLC

Interesting article. I'll share with my other AAA survivors. We talk amongst ourselves all the time. I wonder if you have an opinion on the 5 cm cutoff, which doesn't seem to make much sense. Thanks so much for doing this work. kevin aka FitOldDog:

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