Higher Intake of Flavonoids Linked to Lower Risk for Erectile Dysfunction — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
January 14, 2016

Higher Intake of Flavonoids Linked to Lower Risk for Erectile Dysfunction

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM

Higher intake of certain dietary flavonoids is associated with lower risk for new-onset erectile dysfunction (ED), according to an observational study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Common food sources of the flavonoids in question include blueberries, citrus fruits, melons, and peppers.

As part of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, some 25,000 U.S. men (aged 40–75) completed food-frequency questionnaires and reported on their erectile function about every 4 years. During an average 10 years' follow-up, roughly one-third reported incident ED. After multivariable adjustment, men with the highest intake of flavones, flavanones, or anthocyanins had a roughly 10% lower risk for ED than those with the lowest intake.

The authors say flavonoids could affect erectile function through their role in endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. They estimate that the magnitude of the observed effect is similar to that of 2–5 hours a week of brisk walking.

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