More Evidence for Bariatric Surgery to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
November 3, 2014

More Evidence for Bariatric Surgery to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

Obese patients who undergo bariatric surgery are 80% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who don't have surgery, according to an observational study in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Using a U.K. clinical practice database, researchers matched nearly 2200 obese adults without diabetes who had undergone bariatric surgery between 2002 and 2014 with 2200 obese adults who had not had surgery. The mean BMI among participants at baseline was 43, and the procedures evaluated were laparoscopic gastric banding, gastric bypass, and sleeve gastrectomy.

After a maximum 7 years' follow-up, diabetes had developed in 4% of bariatric-surgery patients versus 16% of controls (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20). All three types of bariatric surgery were associated with reduced diabetes risk.

The researchers note that the risk reduction observed was similar to that seen in the Swedish Obese Subjects study, which enrolled patients between 1987 and 2001. They write: "Our findings, therefore, are important confirmation from a population-based sample that intervention with current surgical procedures can reduce the incidence of diabetes."

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