Advertisement

Donning Gloves After Hand-Washing Prevents More Infections Among Preemies — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
August 12, 2014

Donning Gloves After Hand-Washing Prevents More Infections Among Preemies

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Bloodstream infections among premature infants are halved when healthcare personnel wear gloves in addition to standard hand hygiene, a JAMA Pediatrics study finds.

Some 120 newborns (<29 weeks' gestation or weighing <1000 g) admitted to the neonatal ICU were randomized to one of two groups: in one, healthcare personnel washed their hands and then put on nonsterile gloves before all direct patient, bed, and catheter contact; in the other, personnel simply washed their hands.

Late-onset Gram-positive bloodstream infections occurred less often in the glove group than in the hand-hygiene-alone group (15% vs. 32%), as did possible central-line-associated bloodstream infections (3.4 vs. 9.4 per 1000 central-line days).

Editorialists applaud the researchers but caution: "Because most of these episodes did not meet the traditional Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of a [bloodstream infection] (owing to single positive blood cultures for skin commensal organisms), the interpretation of this finding is likely to generate debate."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement