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Lipitor Lawsuits Among Women Soar in Past 5 Months — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
August 11, 2014

Lipitor Lawsuits Among Women Soar in Past 5 Months

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

Lawsuits by U.S. women who blame Lipitor (atorvastatin) for their type 2 diabetes have soared over the past 5 months, from 56 to nearly 1000 cases representing 4000 women, according to a Reuters investigation.

Lawyers say Lipitor confers a higher diabetes risk in women than in men, and women also see fewer benefits with the drug.

The lawsuits began soon after the FDA warned in 2012 that statins are associated with a small increase in risk for diabetes. The recent surge, however, follows a measure to move all diabetes-related Lipitor lawsuits into one federal courtroom — a measure that Pfizer, the manufacturer, opposed over concerns about copycat suits.

The first trial is set for July 2015.

Reader Comments (3)

Elizabeth R Hatcher MD PhD Physician, Psychiatry, Topeka, Kansas

Several years ago Science News summarized a study of the pharmacology of the various statin drugs, including some clinical information that could guide patients & their doctors in their choice of the most appropriate statin drug. Maybe the authors of the original study could update it in the light of rew data & longer-term clinical experience.

Dr Jon Wilcox Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, Auckland New Zealand

We observe what happens in the USA with amazement. Just why Americans have to sue over anything they can lay their hands on is akin to an extremist religious fervour. Get over it you guys.

Dr. V Kantariya MD Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice

Treat Now or Wait? That is the Question.
Hamlet Soliloquy.

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