Advertisement

Brief Interventions in Primary Care Not Effective for Decreasing Problem Drug Use — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
August 6, 2014

Brief Interventions in Primary Care Not Effective for Decreasing Problem Drug Use

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Brief interventions given in the primary care setting do not help reduce problem drug use, according to two JAMA studies.

In the first study, some 870 adults with problem drug use at safety-net primary care clinics were randomized to either a single, 30-minute intervention using motivational interviewing followed 2 weeks later by a telephone booster, or to usual care. The primary outcomes — days of drug use in the past 30 days and a drug use composite score — did not differ significantly between the groups during the 12-month follow-up.

In the second study, some 530 adults with drug use were randomized to one of two brief counseling interventions or no intervention at an urban primary care clinic. The interventions involved either a 10- to 15-minute interview with health educators that included creating a plan to change behavior, or 30 to 45 minutes of motivational interviewing, followed by a brief booster session, with counselors. At 6 months, the number of days of drug use did not differ significantly across the groups.

(Editors' note: The lead author of the first study is editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry, and the lead author of the second is an associate editor for Physician's First Watch.)

Reader Comments (1)

Carol A Vassar, MD Physician, Internal Medicine, private practice, Vermont

Please explain the purpose of these studies? What was anyone supposed to learn from these studies?

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement