Advertisement

Independent Panel Exonerates BMJ in Statin Controversy — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
August 4, 2014

Independent Panel Exonerates BMJ in Statin Controversy

By Larry Husten

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

An independent review panel has rejected a demand by a prominent researcher that the BMJ retract two controversial articles.

Rory Collins, head of the Cholesterol Treatment Trialists' Collaboration, had demanded that the BMJ retract two articles that were highly critical of statins. Although the journal issued a correction for both papers for inaccurately citing an earlier publication and therefore overstating the incidence of adverse effects of statins, this response did not satisfy Collins. He repeatedly requested that the journal issue a retraction, prompting the BMJ's editor-in-chief to convene an outside panel of experts.

The panel's report exonerates the journal from wrongdoing and said the controversial articles should not be retracted. In fact, the panel was critical of Collins for refusing to submit a published response.

The report did find some minor deficiencies in the editorial process at BMJ and said that the 7-month delay between publication of the articles and the correction was too long.

Panel member Harlan Krumholz, also editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Cardiology, commented: "The panel did not weigh in on the issue of the risk of statins, but judged the merits of the call for retraction. In the end there was little doubt that the opinion pieces in the BMJ did not meet criteria for retraction and the correction that had been made was sufficient."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement