Advertisement

Dalteparin Doesn't Seem to Prevent Pregnancy Complications in Women with Thrombophilia — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
July 25, 2014

Dalteparin Doesn't Seem to Prevent Pregnancy Complications in Women with Thrombophilia

By Kelly Young

Edited by William E. Chavey, MD, MS

Prenatal dalteparin does not reduce the incidence of pregnancy loss, placenta-mediated pregnancy complications, or venous thromboembolism among high-risk women with thrombophilia, according to an open-label trial in the Lancet.

Some 300 pregnant women with confirmed thrombophilia and at least one risk factor for pregnancy complications were randomized to receive either a daily self-injection of dalteparin (a low-molecular-weight heparin) or no dalteparin.

Overall, 18% of patients experienced the primary endpoint — a composite of major venous thromboembolism, severe or early-onset preeclampsia, birth of a small-for-gestational-age infant, or loss of pregnancy — with no significant difference between the groups. However, minor bleeding events were twice as common in the dalteparin group as in the control group (20% vs. 9%).

The authors say their findings "suggest that women with thrombophilia should not be prescribed low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent these complications unless further research suggests benefit."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement