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Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Pressure — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
July 22, 2014

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Pressure

By Larry Husten

Edited by Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Consuming probiotics may modestly improve blood pressure, according to a meta-analysis in Hypertension.

Researchers analyzed data from nine randomized, controlled trials including some 540 participants. Overall, the probiotic arms had a 3.56-mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure and a 2.38-mm Hg reduction in diastolic BP, relative to controls. Larger reductions in blood pressure were observed in trials in which baseline blood pressure was at least 130/85 mm Hg, when treatment lasted at least 8 weeks, and when the daily dose of probiotics contained a larger number of colony-forming units.

The authors note that although the treatment effect was "modest ... even a small reduction of BP may have important public health benefits and cardiovascular consequences." They conclude that their findings "suggest that probiotics may be used as a potential supplement for future interventions to prevent hypertension or improve BP control."

Reader Comments (2)

Dr. V Kantariya MD Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice

Probiotic in Hypertension! This is no Joke. MAKE the
RIGHT CHOICE!

Donald K. Wood, MD, FACS Physician, Surgery, Specialized, Retired but still learning

I am surprised that this kind of data is accepted for publication in a peer review journal. The variables just from personal experience with controlling BP and taking my own BP over several years on different medications and strict dietary regimes has shown that the reductions observed are not significant to draw anything but speculative conclusions.

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