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Stroke Incidence and Mortality on the Decline in U.S. — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
July 16, 2014

Stroke Incidence and Mortality on the Decline in U.S.

By Kelly Young

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM

Stroke incidence and mortality are declining in the U.S., possibly due to better control of hypertension and dyslipidemia, along with smoking cessation, finds a prospective study in JAMA.

Researchers followed over 14,000 black and white individuals who were free of stroke at baseline. From 1987 to 2011, 7% had a stroke.

For each 10-year period, there was a decline in incident stroke (incidence rate ratio, 0.76 for every 10-year interval). The reduction was only apparent in patients aged 65 and older. Age-adjusted mortality following stroke also decreased (hazard ratio, 0.80 for every 10-year interval). For this outcome, younger people saw a greater benefit.

Editorialists caution, "Whether the decline in stroke incidence and mortality will continue in older age groups is still speculative, and the absence of a decline in younger age groups could be an early warning sign."

Reader Comments (1)

CardioGod Other, Other, http://www.cardiogod.com/

Thank you for these news! Let's hope for better!

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