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Pertussis Vaccination in Pregnancy: Study Offers Reassuring Safety Data — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
July 14, 2014

Pertussis Vaccination in Pregnancy: Study Offers Reassuring Safety Data

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

Vaccination against pertussis during the third trimester of pregnancy does not appear to increase the risk for adverse maternal or fetal outcomes, according to a U.K.-based study in the BMJ. (The vaccine in question, Repevax, is similar to the pertussis vaccine that's currently recommended for use during pregnancy in the U.S.)

Using a U.K. primary care database, researchers studied over 20,000 women who were vaccinated against pertussis in their third trimester of pregnancy in late 2012-early 2013, when vaccination was first routinely recommended.

Risk for the primary outcome — stillbirth within 14 days after vaccination — was not increased among the vaccinated women relative to a historical cohort from the pre-vaccination era. In addition, the vaccinated women showed no increase in risks for complications such as preeclampsia, fetal distress, placenta previa, neonatal renal failure, or neonatal death.

Reader Comments (1)

BARBARA LUSTGARTEN Physician, Infectious Disease, office

civil surgeon--give immunizations routinely.

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