Advertisement

TAVI Explored To Treat Aortic Bioprosthesis Failure — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
July 9, 2014

TAVI Explored To Treat Aortic Bioprosthesis Failure

By Larry Husten

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM

With the increasing use of bioprosthetic aortic valves in aortic valve replacement surgery, more physicians will be faced with the dilemma of how best to treat degenerated valves. Although surgical reoperation is considered the best solution, many patients are too old and frail for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proposed for use in this situation, though the risks and benefits have not as yet been well defined.

Now, a new study in JAMA provides information on 460 patients with failed bioprosthetic valves who underwent TAVI. The investigators in the VIVID (Valve-in-Valve International Data) Registry report that the death rate was 7.6% at 1 month and 16.8% at 1 year. Nearly 40% of valve failures were due to stenosis, 30% were due to regurgitation, and 30% were due to a combination of the two.

Survival was lowest in the stenosis group as well as in patients with small valves compared with patients with intermediate or large valves.

Adapted from CardioExchange

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement