Advertisement

Chemo Drug May Cause Patients to Feel Drunk — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 23, 2014

Chemo Drug May Cause Patients to Feel Drunk

By Kristin J. Kelley

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

Ethanol in the cancer drug docetaxel may cause patients to feel intoxicated after treatments, the FDA warned late last week. The drug's label will be updated to include a warning about this.

Different forms of docetaxel — marketed as Taxotere, Docefrez, and as generics — contain varying amounts of alcohol to dissolve the active ingredients so the drug can be administered intravenously. It's used in a variety of cancers, including those of the breast, prostate, and lung.

Patients should avoid driving or operating machinery for 1 to 2 hours after docetaxel infusion. They should also be aware that some pain relievers and sleep aids may exacerbate the drug's intoxicating effects.

Reader Comments (1)

Jacques Brillot D.V.M. Other, Other, Retired

I appreciate to receiv and read often very interesting and sometimes iuseful informations.
Please, go on. Best regards J.B
Even, as maybe you have taken notic tht my patients are animal preferably large and farm ones.
I have been among the first to practice caesarean operations on cows in .France, several thousands. Best regrds.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement