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European Regulators Investigate Cardiovascular Safety of Ibuprofen — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 17, 2014

European Regulators Investigate Cardiovascular Safety of Ibuprofen

By Larry Husten

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and André Sofair, MD, MPH

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has initiated a review of the cardiovascular safety of ibuprofen when taken in high doses over an extended period of time.

In its press release, the EMA said people taking ibuprofen should continue to use it as long as they follow the package label or the instructions of their physician or pharmacist.

The cardiovascular risk of all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been under close scrutiny for many years. The increased risk associated with one group of NSAIDs, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, has been known for more than a decade. Researchers have also found evidence for cardiovascular problems with the NSAID diclofenac.

The agency is also investigating the interaction of ibuprofen with low-dose aspirin.

The EMA said it had found no evidence for a problem in people taking ibuprofen doses less than 2400 mg/day or for short periods of time. "Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used medicines for pain and inflammation and has a well-known safety profile, particularly at usual doses," the agency said.

Adapted from CardioExchange.

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