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Canola Oil Linked to Improved Glucose Control in Type 2 Diabetes — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 16, 2014

Canola Oil Linked to Improved Glucose Control in Type 2 Diabetes

By Kelly Young

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

A low glycemic-load diet supplemented with canola oil is associated with slight improvements in glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, compared with a diet emphasizing whole grain. The industry-funded study was published in Diabetes Care and was presented at the American Diabetes Association's annual conference.

Roughly 140 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive either the intervention diet (4.5 slices of canola oil-enriched whole wheat bread daily plus advice to consume foods low on the glycemic index) or the control diet (7.5 slices of whole-wheat bread without canola oil plus advice to replace white-flour foods with whole grains).

Over 12 weeks, the intervention diet was associated with a modest reduction in HbA1c relative to the control diet (–.47% vs. –.31% HbA1c units). Patients with elevated systolic blood pressure saw the biggest gains. Patients consuming the intervention diet also had greater improvements on their Framingham risk scores.

Reader Comments (3)

A. Karperien Other, Neurology, Charles Sturt University

Agree with Dr. Simpler. Shameful.

ABEL ALFONSO Physician, Endocrinology, Private Practice

Completely agree with Dr. Simpler's comment!

DANA SIMPLER Physician, Internal Medicine, private practice

Why would any respectable journal even publish this kind of manipulative study. Even your summary reveals gross error in the study design by NOT controlling for carb intake - 4 slices of bread compared to 7.5 slices of bread and otherwise giving different dietary advice to the two groups. There is no logical way to conclude that the canola oil had anything to do with the results.

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