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Bionic Pancreas Associated with Better Glycemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 16, 2014

Bionic Pancreas Associated with Better Glycemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes

By Kelly Young

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

An investigational bionic pancreas — a wearable, automated, bihormonal device — is associated with better glycemic control than the current standard of care in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to crossover studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting. (Of note, several authors hold patents or have pending patent applications on blood-glucose-control systems.)

During the 5-day intervention, patients wore a bionic pancreas that received data wirelessly from a continuous glucose monitor. Patients could tell the device the approximate size of their meals, and it delivered glucagon and insulin, based on an adaptive algorithm. During the control period, patients used their insulin pumps.

For 20 adults, the mean plasma glucose during the bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg/dL, and the percentage of time with glucose readings under 70 mg/dL was 4.8%.

For 32 adolescents, their scheduled mean plasma glucose was 138 mg/dL during the bionic-pancreas period and 157 mg/dL during the control period. Adolescents didn't see a reduction in the time with hypoglycemia, possibly, the authors say, because their hypoglycemia was rapidly addressed in a camp setting.

Reader Comments (2)

Henry Goodman MD Physician, Neurology, home

would love knowing more

Hector Garcia Other, Unspecified

I would like to volunteer to participate in any clinical trials. Can anyone provide me with contact information on this matter?

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