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CPAP Addresses Some, But Not All, Cardiovascular Risks from Sleep Apnea — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 13, 2014

CPAP Addresses Some, But Not All, Cardiovascular Risks from Sleep Apnea

By Joe Elia

Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS

Two studies offer additional data on the role of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in lessening the cardiovascular-associated risks of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Both appear in the New England Journal of Medicine.

One study, using changes in mean arterial pressure as the primary outcome, randomized roughly 300 patients with OSA and high cardiovascular risk to education alone or to education plus either nocturnal oxygen supplementation or CPAP. At 12 weeks, the CPAP group had significantly lower mean arterial pressure than the education-alone or oxygen group.

The other study, comprising roughly 150 patients, randomized participants to CPAP, a weight-loss intervention, or both for 24 weeks. C-reactive protein, the study's primary endpoint, dropped significantly in the weight-loss and combined-therapy groups, but not the CPAP-alone group. Systolic blood pressure was reduced in all three groups.

Reader Comments (1)

Dr Resident, Anesthesiology

so great.

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