Advertisement

FDA and EPA: Pregnant and Breast-Feeding Women Should Eat More Fish — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 11, 2014

FDA and EPA: Pregnant and Breast-Feeding Women Should Eat More Fish

By Kristin J. Kelley

Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM

Pregnant women and those who might become pregnant, as well as breast-feeding women and children, should eat of a variety of fish two to three times a week (8–12 oz. weekly) to support growth and development, the FDA and EPA recommend in draft guidance. The fish should be low in mercury (e.g., canned light tuna, catfish, cod, salmon, tilapia).

The recommendation, which is consistent with the USDA's 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, also advises against eating the following types of fish because they contain higher levels of methylmercury:

  • Albacore tuna (limit of 6 oz./week)

  • King mackerel

  • Shark

  • Swordfish

  • Tilefish (from the Gulf of Mexico)

Pregnant women are not eating enough fish, according to an FDA analysis. Data based on some 1000 women found that 21% had not consumed any fish in 1 month and 75% ate less than 4 oz. a week.

Reader Comments (1)

Magali Gravier Other, Other

Mercury is toxic, but what about pesticides? It seems that some fish farms in Norway treat salmon with unauthorized pesticides. On 3 June 2013, the French " Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire de l’alimentation, de l’environnement et du travail (Anses) has downed the recommendations from 3 times a week to not more than twice a week, because it is not sure whether the benefits of eating (a.o. fatty) fish like e.g. salmon but also sweet water fish ("bio-accumulators") are higher than the negative risk due over-exposition to chemicals. In other words, testing fish for mercury is one thing, but does it allow concluding on the extent to which fish is "safe", knowing that some fish may contain other toxic substances?

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement