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First Buccal Therapy Approved for Opioid Dependence — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
June 9, 2014

First Buccal Therapy Approved for Opioid Dependence

By Amy Orciari Herman

Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD

The FDA has approved the first mucoadhesive buccal film therapy for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, the manufacturer announced on Friday. Bunavail — a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone — should be used along with counseling and psychosocial support.

The manufacturer says that this mode of delivery is more potent and therefore requires half the dose of the currently marketed sublingual formulation (Suboxone). This "may help to reduce the potential for misuse and diversion and potentially lessen the incidence of certain side effects," the company says.

Reader Comments (3)

NIMROD PIK Physician, Psychiatry

In reply to Dr. Richardson: I'm not sure we're trying to compete with heroin for price, attractiveness or any other parameter - this is medicine offered to people who WANT to stop using heroin.

Thomas Richardson, MD Physician, Emergency Medicine, Hendricks Regional Health

If it works, this is great. The problem is heroin is cheap. This in all likelihood is not. If this can be toned down to be roughly the cost of, or less, than heroin use then it might be more utilized.

J

Interesting

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