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Large Study Uncovers New Details About the Role of Hypertension in Cardiovascular Disease — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 30, 2014

Large Study Uncovers New Details About the Role of Hypertension in Cardiovascular Disease

By Larry Husten

Edited by Andre Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS

Different types of hypertension at different stages of life have different cardiovascular effects, according to a large study in the Lancet.

U.K. researchers analyzed data on 1.25 million people aged 30 or older and without baseline cardiovascular disease. Among the findings, over roughly 5 years' follow-up:

  • Elevated systolic blood pressure (BP) was strongly linked to intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and stable angina, but had only a weak association with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).

  • Diastolic BP was a less powerful predictor of most cardiovascular diseases than systolic pressure, though it was a strong predictor of AAA.

  • Pulse pressure (systolic pressure minus diastolic) had an inverse correlation with AAA but was a strong predictor of peripheral arterial disease.

In contrast to some previous studies, there was no evidence for a J-shaped curve showing that the lowest BP levels were associated with increased risk. Instead, people with the lowest BP levels (90–114 mm Hg systolic and 60–74 mm Hg diastolic) had the lowest risk for cardiovascular disease.

Adapted from CardioExchange

Reader Comments (3)

THOMAS KLINE

This is new? I was taught this in medical school in the 1970's

Thomas F. Kline MD

ps was also taught that only three interventions have actually
prolonged life: antibiotics, vaccines, and BP control

Will Wiggins Medical Student

That comment was just plain hilarious.

MAHMOOD AYYOOB Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, kuwait

Thats woderul analysis that helps to predicts complications and helps to focus care.

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