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U.S. Measles Is at Highest Level in 20 Years — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 30, 2014

U.S. Measles Is at Highest Level in 20 Years

By Cara Adler

Edited by Andre Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS

The number of measles cases reported in the U.S. so far this year is the highest since 1994, according to an MMWR article. The disease was declared eliminated in 2000.

As of May 23, some 288 confirmed cases were reported to the CDC from 18 states and New York City. Nearly all cases (97%) were associated with importations, and most were in people who were not vaccinated (69%) or who had unknown vaccination status (20%). Among imported cases, the disease was acquired during travel to 18 countries, with most cases acquired in the Philippines and India. An ongoing outbreak among unvaccinated Amish people in Ohio accounted for nearly half of the cases. Patients cited religious beliefs and philosophical objections as the primary reasons for not being vaccinated.

The authors conclude: "Maintenance of high vaccination coverage, ensuring timely vaccination before travel, and early detection and isolation of cases are key factors to limit importations and the spread of disease."

Reader Comments (2)

Steven Gartzman, MD, FACEP, FAAEM Physician, Emergency Medicine, Houston, TX

The inappropiate and negligent behavior of news organizations (giving on-air publicity to strippers promoting the 'dangers' of vaccinations) is disgusting. I hope these networks, celebrities & lay-pundits all get prosecuted for morbidity/ mortality suffered by children because parents were frightened into not vaccinating.

CHERYL DAVIES Other Healthcare Professional, Cardiology, Hospital

Thank you Jenny McCarthy and others of your ilk. It is shameful, shameful, what you have done.

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