Advertisement

H. pylori Eradication Therapy Lowers Risk for Gastric Cancer in High-Risk Adults — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 23, 2014

H. pylori Eradication Therapy Lowers Risk for Gastric Cancer in High-Risk Adults

By Cara Adler

Eradicating Helicobacter pylori in asymptomatic, healthy adults reduces the incidence of subsequent gastric cancer, according to a meta-analysis in BMJ.

Researchers identified six randomized, controlled trials that assessed the effect of eradication therapy on gastric cancer incidence 2 or more years later in adults who tested positive for H. pylori but had no symptoms and were healthy. A variety of eradication therapies were used. Control groups received placebo or no therapy.

In a pooled analysis of some 6500 patients, the incidence of gastric cancer was 1.6% among those who received eradication therapy and 2.4% among controls (relative risk, 0.66). Of note, only one trial was conducted in a non-Asian population, and it showed no benefit.

The authors conclude: "It seems likely that the benefit of searching for and eradicating H. pylori in healthy asymptomatic individuals will outweigh any potential harms, especially in populations at high risk of gastric cancer. However, results from further trials in different populations are urgently needed."

Reader Comments (2)

zafar I Bhatti Physician, Pediatric Subspecialty, Wexford General Hospital Ireland

need more evidence /Study

Sanford R Kimmel, M.D. Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences

Although decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer is a laudable goal, the findings of this study are only applicable to an eastern Asian population, as noted by the authors. Therefore, the eradication of H. pyori for this purpose might only be considered for a population at particularly high risk for gastric cancer. Unfortunately, widespread use of antibiotic therapy to eradicate H. Pylori quite likely will result to the problem of increasing antibiotic resistance by this organism. As has often been the case over the long term, we may find that the "bugs" (bacteria, viruses, etc) are "smarter" then we are.

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement