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Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Concussion, Cognition, and the Hippocampi in Collegiate Football Players — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 14, 2014

Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Concussion, Cognition, and the Hippocampi in Collegiate Football Players

By the NEJM Journal Watch Editors

Left hippocampal volumes and reaction times correlate with clinician-diagnosed concussion, according to a study among some 50 college football players published in JAMA.

Reader Comments (2)

Carol Drabik, RN, BS CRRN Other Healthcare Professional, Unspecified, Insurance

Rugby is far more dangerous. What will we do?

BARRY SMITH Other, Other, University of Maryland

As evidence of neurological damage in football players mounts, I believe we must recognize and address the "elephant in the room": Should football be banned? A radical ideas perhaps, but an important one to seriously consider. I believe there is more than enough evidence now to at least ban high school football immediately. Our reliance on evidence-based medicine demands that we work, as a medical community, to eliminate football. We should begin with a high school ban, because young athletes often do not have the judgment to refuse to play. We can then move on to college and, finally, to professional football. It will take decades to eliminate professional football, but it could be banned in high schools across the country in relatively short order. In addition to protecting our children, this has the advantage of eliminating the primary source of college-level players, and that, in turn, reduces the population of young athletes available to professional teams. A tough chore? Certainly. But we must work toward this goal. The evidence requires it.

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