Advertisement

Frailty Score May Help Predict Mortality Risk After Surgery — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 8, 2014

Frailty Score May Help Predict Mortality Risk After Surgery

By Kelly Young

A new frailty score derived from the comprehensive geriatric assessment may predict postoperative mortality in the elderly better than conventional methods, researchers conclude in JAMA Surgery.

Nearly 300 patients aged 65 and older who were undergoing elective surgery at a single hospital were scored on nine preoperative characteristics: malignancy, comorbidities, albumin level, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, dementia, delirium risk, malnutrition, and arm circumference. The highest potential score, indicating highest risk, was 15.

Compared with low-risk patients (score, 5 or lower), high-risk patients (above 5) had a higher 1-year mortality risk (hazard ratio, 9.01) and longer postoperative hospital stays (median, 9 vs. 6 days).

A commentator writes that this model predicted mortality better than the American Society of Anesthesiologists score: "This is a paradigm shift," he says, "and it shows that we are now beginning to understand the true nature of age-related physiological changes in the patients on whom we operate."

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement