Advertisement

WHO: Antibiotic Resistance a Major Public Health Threat Globally — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
May 1, 2014

WHO: Antibiotic Resistance a Major Public Health Threat Globally

By Kelly Young

Antibiotic resistance "has reached alarming levels in many parts of the world" and is now a major public health threat, according to a World Health Organization report.

The WHO surveyed member nations for antibiotic resistance in seven common bacteria. Among the findings:

  • Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae has spread to all areas of the world. In some nations, carbapenem antibiotics are ineffective in over 54% of patients.

  • Treatment failure with third-generation cephalosporins — the last-resort treatment for gonorrhea — has been confirmed in 36 countries, including Austria, Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, and the U.K.

  • In some countries, fluoroquinolones are ineffective for Escherichia coli-related urinary tract infections more than half the time.

The WHO says that proper surveillance to antimicrobial resistance is lacking in much of the world. It plans to develop tools and standards for tracking drug resistance, taking cues from its programs to fight malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV.

Reader Comments (1)

Margaret Tarchetti Other Healthcare Professional, Other, Children;s Hospital "J. M. de los Rios" CCS Venezuela

I find this information very important because at this moment here in Venezuela we are going through a real health crisis, medication is scarce, knowing about resistance to different antibiotics help to recomend the right one from the start because at this time we can't waste anything. Working at a public hospital our patient usually come in dire state where getting right from the start is VERY IMPORTANT. THANK YOU!!!

Your Comment

(will not be published)

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Do you have any conflict of interest to disclose?
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Vertical Tabs

* Required

Reader comments are intended to encourage lively discussion of clinical topics with your peers in the medical community. We ask that you keep your remarks to a reasonable length, and we reserve the right to withhold publication of remarks that do not meet this standard.

PRIVACY: We will not use your email address, submitted for a comment, for any other purpose nor sell, rent, or share your e-mail address with any third parties. Please see our Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement