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Dietary Fiber After MI Linked to Improved Survival — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
April 30, 2014

Dietary Fiber After MI Linked to Improved Survival

By Larry Husten

Consuming more dietary fiber after myocardial infarction is associated with a reduced risk for death, a BMJ study finds.

Researchers analyzed long-term data about diet and other risk factors from more than 4000 healthcare professionals who had an MI. Nine years after the MI, people who were in the highest quintile of fiber consumption had a 25% lower risk for death from any cause. Overall, there was a 15% reduction in mortality risk associated with every 10-g/day increase in fiber intake.

The strongest association was observed for fiber derived from cereals and grains. A strong benefit was also found for people with the largest increases in fiber consumption after their MI. The findings remained significant after adjustment for other factors known to influence survival after MI. However, the authors acknowledge that they were unable to "fully adjust for all known or unknown healthy lifestyle changes."

The authors note that less than 5% of people in the U.S. consume the minimum recommended amount of fiber (25 g/day for women and 38 g/day for men).

Adapted from CardioExchange.

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