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USPSTF Draft Recommendations: Behavioral Counseling and Screening for STIs for Those at High Risk — Physician’s First Watch

Medical News |
April 29, 2014

USPSTF Draft Recommendations: Behavioral Counseling and Screening for STIs for Those at High Risk

By Kelly Young

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that all sexually-active adolescents and high-risk adults undergo intensive behavioral counseling (i.e., contact time lasting more than 2 hours) to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

High-risk adults include those with current STIs or STIs within the past year, those with more than one sex partner, or those with inconsistent condom use. The group's review of evidence found that some of the moderate-intensity interventions (contact time between a half hour and 2 hours) were also effective.

The task force also recommends screening for gonorrhea and chlamydia in women who are under age 25 and older women at increased risk. Patients should be screened when their risk factors change (e.g., new sex partner). They recommend testing for gonorrhea and chlamydia simultaneously using nucleic acid amplification tests. There was not enough evidence for the task force to recommend for or against screening for these STIs in men.

The draft recommendations are open to public comment on the USPSTF's website until May 26.

Reader Comments (1)

ROGER FELIX Physician, Family Medicine/General Practice

...and here is another impossible-to-follow guideline for primary care physicians. Hey, we don't really need to get home in time for dinner, do we? A two-hour intensive intervention on the subject of avoiding STIs, culturally tailored to the patient? Who is going to pay me for that? Nobody. What am I even going to talk about for more than hours, face-to-face with an adolescent or young adult? Yes, I read the draft recommendation. It was derived from some serious non-real-world research interventions. I'm glad those interventions worked. I really doubt I can find these resources in most communities. I respect what the USPSTF does, but this is way over the top.

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